About NAAP
Founded by Activity Professionals
for Activity Professionals...

NAAP is the only national group that
represents activity professionals in
geriatric settings exclusively. NAAP
serves as a catalyst for both professional
and personal growth and has come to be
recognized by government officials as
the voice of the activity profession on
national issues concerning long-term
care facilities, retirement living, assisted
living, adult day services, and senior
citizen centers. NAAP is nationwide in
scope with a growing membership in
Canada and Bermuda.

The National Association of Activity
Professionals recognizes the following
values:

The quality of life of the
client/resident/participant/patient served
is the primary reason for our services.

The strength of NAAP lies in the diversity
of its members.  NAAP recognizes the
rich cultural, and educational
backgrounds of its members and values
the variety of resources represented.

The strength of NAAP also lies in the
development and promotion of scientific
research which further defines and
supports the activity profession.

NAAP values the development and
maintenance of coalitions with
organizations whose mission is similar to
that of NAAP's for the purposes of
advocacy, research, education, and
promotion of activity services and
activity professionals.

NAAP values members who become
involved at the state and national level
to promote professional standards as well
as encourage employers to recognize
them as professionals.

NAAP affords Activity Professionals
across the country the opportunity to
speak with a common voice...

NAAP successfully worked with members
of Congress to secure a change in the
nursing home reform title of the 1987
Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act
(OBRA). Through our efforts, it became
mandatory that an activity program,
directed by a qualified professional, be
provided in every nursing home that
receives Medicare and/or Medicaid
funds.

NAAP was the only professional activity
association to participate in HCFA's
workgroups that revised OBRA's
interpretive guidelines now in effect.

NAAP provides assistance at the state
level to promote certification of activity
professionals, working toward uniform
professional standards for activity
practice.
NAAP Mission Statement
To provide excellence in support services to activity professionals through education,
advocacy, technical assistance, promotion of standards,
fostering of research, and peer and industry relations.
MEMBERSHIP
WHY NOT JOIN NOW?
There are so many benefits when you
belong to NAAP!  Each member will
receive a newsletter which will give
the updated reports on Government
Relations, Special Interests,
International Updates, Professional
Development, Nominations,
Standards of Practice, Financial
Updates and a Membership Report.
Along with this comes an update
from our President, Diane Mockbee,
and our Executive Director, Charles
Taylor.

Members will also receive a
discounted rate at the Annual
Conference which is held in
March/April of each year.

Effective JAN 1, 2006 membership
dues are:
Active Membership = $75 US dollars
Associate Membership = $65 US
dollars
International Membership (outside
US) = $65 USD
Student Membership = $55 US dollars
Supportive Membership = $99 US
dollars

Email us for more information at
membership@thenaap.com.

Join Now!

You can download and mail in this
application with your payment or use
our new
online registration.
ACTIVITY DIRECTOR TODAY
Providing Internet Resources
for Activity Professionals
in Long Term Care Settings
admin@theactivitydirectorsoffice.com

Copyright 2004-Present
The Activity Director's Office
All Rights Reserved

Disclaimer
The NAAP Page
National Association of Activity Professionals
Founded by Activity Professionals for Activity Professionals...
Join Today!  You can download and mail in this application with your payment or use our new online registration
DEBBIE BERA
ACTIVITY DIRECTOR TODAY
SENSORY OVERLOAD INSERVICE

  • Room Set-up:  Chairs in a circle
  • Attendence:  16-40
  • Benefits:  Non-verbal communication, Listening with your body,  Concentration,
    Flexibility, Teamwork, and  Empathy.

This is a very prop-heavy exercise. Suggested items listed:
•        An inflatable or squishy ball, one that is easy to grasp
•        A hat to put on a participant’s head
•        A bag of crackers, enough for participants to eat some
•        Bean bag, two bright colors
•        Sun glasses, large plastic
•        A shoe, tie the laces in a bow
•        Bubbles, bubble wand for participants to blow bubbles

Group Set-up:
The number of items depends on the size of the group. Be creative when selecting items to
maximize this as an inter-active experience. Place all items on a table by the group leader
for an easy introduction into the circle.

Guideline:
Everyone takes a place in the circle. Introduce the ball as the heartbeat of the circle. No
matter what you cannot let the ball drop or stop. As the ball is passed around tell them to
think about how the need to give and take the ball. After the ball has gone around the circle
a few times slowly introduce the other items, and give clear instructions like place the hat on
the next person. Remember to remind the group that the ball is the most important thing in
the exercise. Continue to introduce the rest of the items keeping the group active.
Variations are to take out one by one when they reach the leader till only the ball is left.
Other times the ball has dropped when there are a lot of items going around the circle if this
happens, allow time for the group members to express why they think the ball dropped.
Provide ample time for the group share their emotions, and what they learned.

Inservice Summary:
New approaches may arise each time this game is played. You need to be open with your
expectations. This exercise is like our own normal day when we are trying to get through one
task and we are bombarded with more, and more “things”. This is an excellent example of
the world of the person with Alzheimer’s. They are just trying to concentrate on one thing at
a time, but when there are to many sensory objects, and with people interrupting their focus
it is harder for them to deal with simple tasks causing frustration, and low-self esteem.

Submitted by: Joan M. Flannigan, ACC
              Nominations Trustee
ACTIVITY DIRECTOR TODAY
ACTIVITY DIRECTOR
TODAY E-MAGAZINE
Save over 33%
off cover price
Subscribe Today
FREE SAMPLE
Corporate Discount
Save over 50%
off cover price
Download Corporate Order
Form HERE.
This message board is a
terrific  resource for you.  
Network with other AD's.  
Join today and keep up to
date with what's going in
the world of Activities.

IT'S  FREE
Join Now

This site is moderated by
Robert & Linda Lucas,
Owners of
Activity Director
Today
website.
BACK      HOME